Thursday, November 15, 2018

Bison Advise
Riding across the Standing Rock Reservation last June working on a story for Harley-Davidson came across some good advise.  Felt the need to share it again.

Cherish wide-open spaces
Stand your ground
Have a tough hide
Keep moving on
Have a strong spirit
Let the chips fall where they may
Roam wild and free 

be strong, be safe, Talon 

Wednesday, November 14, 2018

Life Is Good In The Borderland
Columbus New Mexico just a short three miles from Puerto Palomas de Villa, also known simply as Palomas, a small town of 4,688 people in the in the Mexican state of Chihuahua.  Nancy and I just returned from a two day trip across the border at Columbus to Palomas.  You might ask,  Why did you go to a small village across the border in Mexico?  Could it possibly be for some of the best dental and eye care available at a small fraction of the cost for the same services in the US?  Not difficult to answer that question.  Wonderful, thoughtful, friendly folks across the border.  One of the nicest experiences and best services we have had in quite some time.  Going back?  You bet!
Pancho Villa On His Indian Motorcycle. The US Army Used Harleys To Try To Catch Him.
Learned some interesting history while we were in Columbus.  In 1916 the US Army was unable to catch Mexican Pancho Villa along US border towns. They asked Harley-Davidson  for motorcycles to help track down and catch him. Harley sent them thirty-five motorcycles. While they did not help the Army catch Pancho Villa the Army realized the value of Harley-Davidson motorcycles to the military.  Maybe it was because Pancho was riding an Indian...?

On all my motorcycle photo essays as I ride from border to border across this great US country I am always amazed how lines drawn on maps and walls as barriers try to separate us as human beings.

Life is good in the borderland.  You have only to experience it.

be strong, be safe, Talon

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Greater Chaco Landscape Workshop
 April 9 - 13, 2019

Chaco Culture National Historical Park, located in northwest New Mexico, is arguably the most significant ancient cultural site in the United States.  Between AD 600 and 1260 Chaco Canyon was a major hub for the Ancient Pueblo People.  The canyon contains the remnants of great houses, kivas, roads, gridded gardens and irrigation systems built by a people who were proficient in astronomy, architecture, agriculture and the arts.   This workshop presents a rare opportunity to explore and photograph Chaco Canyon’s great architectural and cultural heritage.  You’ll walk on ancient roads and through buildings placed and designed by the cycles of the moon and sun, and by the Chacoan’s amazing innate grasp of engineering parallel to today’s technology.
The workshop will also focus on the breathtaking surrounding areas known as the Greater Chaco Landscape.  This includes Angel Peak Badlands and Ah-Shi-Sle-Pha, two areas known for its unusual geological landforms found only in the Four Corners Region of New Mexico.  While photographing some of Mother Earth’s finest work you’ll also learn how the Chacoans built roads and outliers (smaller inhabited villages) throughout these areas, all of which are linked directly to Chaco Canyon. 
This four-day workshop is directed to the photographer seeking a unique off the beaten path experience.  Please note there will be a fair amount of walking in open desert landscape.  Weather in April averages 60 to 70 degrees during the day with evenings as low as 30 degrees. The workshop will be based out of the historic Casa Blanca Inn in Farmington, New Mexico, about a three and half hour drive from either Santa Fe or Albuquerque.

The workshop is limited to 8 participants.  Your tax-deductible donation of $1850.00 includes honorariums, most meals, water, light beverages and snacks.  Lodging and transportation are not included.  For your convenience we have set aside rooms at the Casa Blanca Inn.   To register for the workshop please click HERE.


I've spent the last sixteen years photographing and documenting Chaco Canyon, its artifacts, and its outlying sacred sites.  As you explore the area with me, you'll understand why I'm so passionate about preserving Chaco Canyon's legacy for future generations to come.  Your tax-deductible workshop donation allows us to continue to produce this necessary and timely work.  To learn more please visit Question of Power.

be strong, be safe, Carlan

Monday, October 8, 2018

Kutz Stairway - Greater Chaco Viewscape
The Great North Road from Chaco Canyon leaves Pierre's Outlier heading directly to Upper Twin Angels mound in the Angel Peak Badlands.  A small shrine-like ruin sits on top of the mound.  This marks the point where the North Road ends and the Kutz Stairway descends 500 feet into the canyon.  People of Chaco traveled along the bottom of Kutz Canyon to Twin Angels Outlier over 800 years ago.  The stairway is a challenge to define due to hundreds of years of erosion and the industrialization of the area by oil and gas development.

Kutz Canyon is dotted with well pads and multiple crisscrossing oil and gas access roads.  Along the canyon rim the Great North Road has been covered with fracking fluid evaporation ponds.

Nancy and I spent several days last week along the rim and in the canyon working to capture the spirit, meaning and importance of this sacred site.  Click here to view Kutz Stairway - Greater Chaco Viewscape.

be strong, be safe, Talon